Categoria: Notizie dal mondo

L’électrosensibilité fait son entrée dans le dictionnaire Larousse

18 maggio 2015 – “Priartem et le Collectif des Electrosensibles de France”

[Tra i nuovi 150 termini inseriti nel prestigiosissimo dizionario enciclopedico francese Larousse compare quello di Elettrosensibilità:

Electrosensibilité : “Ensemble des troubles physiques dus, selon la description des personnes atteintes, à une sensibilité excessive aux ondes et aux champs électromagnétiques ambiants.

Questo è ciò che accade nei paesi attenti alle problematiche sociali e sanitarie.]

Ce lundi, le vénérable dictionnaire Larousse dévoile les 150 nouveaux mots de son édition 2016, parmi eux : l’électrosensibilité, avec cette définition :

“ensemble des troubles physiques dus, selon la description des personnes atteintes, à une sensibilité excessive aux ondes et aux champs électromagnétiques ambiants”.

Pour Sophie Pelletier, porte-parole d’Electrosensibles de France / Priartem, c’est un symbole extrêmement fort : « Après son entrée en janvier dernier dans la loi Abeille sur la sobriété en matière d’ondes, le terme électrosensibilité est maintenant validé par une référence de la langue française. Cette définition, simple, consacre la réalité somatique des troubles tout en évitant habilement l’ornière de la controverse sur leur origine ».

Rappelons que les chiffres les plus récents concernant cette affection la consacre comme un véritable problème de santé publique : dans les années 90, en Californie, 5 personnes pour 1000 avaient déclaré avoir dû changer de travail pour cause d’électrosensibilité et 17% des employées d’une firme multinationale de télécommunications suédoise en étaient affectés ; une fourchette de 8 – 10 % de la population, atteinte à des degrés divers, est admise aujourd’hui concernant l’Allemagne ; la France ne dispose toujours d’aucun chiffre officiel, malgré nos demandes (1).

Pour Sophie Pelletier, cette définition est globalement satisfaisante dans l’état actuel de la controverse mais elle doit pouvoir évoluer avec l’avancée des connaissances car si aujourd’hui on en connaît très peu sur l’électrosensibilité elle-même, de plus en plus d’études apportent des éclairages sur l’impact des ondes sur l’organisme et sur la variabilité des réactions individuelles à ces agressions environnementales : « Aujourd’hui, on ne connaît quasiment rien sur les mécanismes produisant cette perte de tolérance aux ondes et si plusieurs méthodes diagnostic existent, aucune ne fait référence au niveau académique. Malheureusement, la Haute Autorité de Santé se refuse toujours à se pencher sur cette maladie environnementale émergente. L’ANSES, quant à elle, doit remettre un rapport et nous espérons que certaines données fondamentales concernant les effets biologiques des ondes, notamment sur le cerveau, pourront être mises en lumière. Après cette entrée dans le dictionnaire, nous attendons avec impatience que l’électrosensibilité fasse un jour son entrée dans le Larousse médical ! ».

Articolo originale al seguente link:

http://www.priartem.fr/L-electrosensibilite-fait-son.html

Brain on fire: Living with electromagnetic hypersensitivity

4 settembre 2015 – “stuff.co.nz – well&good”, by Mark White

IT specialist Steve Weller describes the pain of EMS as like "a tight-fitting hat being pulled down on your head".
IT specialist Steve Weller describes the pain of EMS as like “a tight-fitting hat being pulled down on your head”.

Hellish headaches are just the start for people with electromagnetic hypersensitivity – and in our wi-fi world, there’s almost nowhere to hide.

After an hour of measuring radio-frequency levels around Benalla, the north-eastern Victorian city of 9300 deep in Ned Kelly country, Australia, Bruce Evans puts down his smartphone-sized digital meter.

He says he wants to demonstrate how badly cordless phones leak radiation, and there’s one in the Benalla bookshop he can test. He strides off with intent on a sunny Sunday morning, a burly man with a shaved head, like a friendly bouncer you nonetheless wouldn’t want to mess with.

EHS sufferer Bruce Evans.
EHS sufferer Bruce Evans.

Evans, a 50-year-old web designer and former Australian Army commando, is showing me where he can go without falling ill. He says he has a controversial condition known as electromagnetic hypersensitivity (EHS), triggered by electromagnetic fields (EMF) emitted by power lines, devices such as smartphones and laptops, by wireless routers and towers pumping out telco and NBN signals – the building blocks of the modern economy; indeed, of modern living as we know it.

Symptoms range from a mild headache through to tingles, tinnitus and heart palpitations to incapacitating migraines, fatigue and nausea. Being EHS puts a huge mental strain on sufferers, both from their symptoms and from not being believed.

EHS is contentious because the radio-frequency levels at which sufferers say they’re affected fall well below those considered dangerous by regulators. And its existence is denied by mainstream medicine. While allergies can be tested with a needle-prick blood sample, there is no accepted diagnostic test for EHS, so most sufferers are self-diagnosed. “The collection of symptoms,” says a World Health Organisation (WHO) fact sheet, “is not part of any recognised syndrome.”

Theo R, who has moved to an isolated property with his partner Irma.
Theo R, who has moved to an isolated property with his partner Irma.


We enter the bookshop. Evans doesn’t recognise the young woman behind the counter. He reaches into his backpack and removes his meter. “I was wondering if I could just measure the telephone?” he asks.

“Hi,” I add. “I’m from Good Weekend magazine, we’re doing a story about – ” I fumble briefly ” – how some electrical items leak electricity … ”

The woman freezes. “I’m sorry,” she finally says. “If I had some proof of who you are … ”

Signs outside Theo and Irma's home.
Signs outside Theo and Irma’s home.

We leave without the measurement but with a glimpse into Evans’ world. “She was probably looking for the big red button under the counter to call the Men in Black,” he jokes.

Sufferers of EHS say they are environmental refugees in their own country, moving to other cities or suburbs or retreating to remote rural hideaways to escape their symptoms. I spoke to a dozen sufferers, some of whom coat their houses in paint that reflects electromagnetic radiation (EMR), fit wire mesh over their windows, or wear protective caps made of cotton-metal-blend fabric. Shielding items cost dearly: one online business lists a five-litre pot of paint for NZ$550 and a protective iPhone 6 case for NZ$60. “The number of people contacting us with EMR-related problems is absolutely growing,” says EMR Australia director Lyn McLean.

Steve Weller, a 46-year-old IT specialist, moved his family from Melbourne to Brisbane because of EHS, but continues to search for a “haven”. He describes his symptoms as akin to “a tight-fitting hat being pulled down on your head, often accompanied by a pricking feeling over the scalp”.

Bruce Evans with his smartphone-sized digital meter.
Bruce Evans with his smartphone-sized digital meter.

Wendy McClelland, 57, has been on a government disability pension since 2003 because of her EHS symptoms. She covers her face with a shielding cloth and sunglasses when she drives into Ballarat from her isolated property in country Victoria – and has been abused at traffic lights because people think she’s Muslim.

Bruce Evans has a vision for sufferers of EHS. He wants to build a community in an area of low EMF emissions, known as a White Zone, where victims can live and thrive together. There are a handful globally, largely in northern Europe and the US. Evans’ community could take root at his dad’s farm at Myrrhee, in north-east Victoria, on land his family has worked for 150 years. It could then expand through the valley, a dead zone for mobile phone signals … for now, at least.

The WHO insists there’s “no scientific basis” for a link between EMF exposure and EHS, but agrees the symptoms are real. Estimates of EHS’s prevalence vary widely, from one in 30 people to a few in a million.

EHS sufferer Irma.
EHS sufferer Irma.

The Australian Medical Association declined to comment on EHS. Michael Repacholi, the Australian former co-ordinator of the WHO’s Radiation and Environmental Health unit, says studies show “as conclusively as possible” that sufferers’ symptoms are not due to EMF, but could have another explanation. He suggests EHS could be “psychosomatic”.

But sufferers insist their symptoms are real, and caused by EMF. “Cate”, a 43-year-old project manager in health evaluation in Sydney, doesn’t want her name published because she’s worried she’ll be “pigeon-holed by colleagues”. She believes she’s a likely EHS sufferer – it’s the only explanation for five years of severe nausea, muscle weakness, migraines and body tingling.

After she moved from her inner-city unit to outer Sydney, where a friend of hers has measured 16,000 times less EMF exposure, she says her health improved significantly. A nodule on her thyroid, which was set for surgery, stopped growing.

EHS has had some high-profile sufferers, including Gro Harlem Brundtland, a former Norwegian prime minister and WHO director-general, who banned mobile phones in her office as they gave her headaches.

Chuck, a character with EHS in the Breaking Bad spin-off series Better Call Saul, confines himself to his house, which has the electricity disconnected. In one episode he sprints outside for a few seconds, wrapped in a metallic sheet that flaps behind him like Batman’s cape. His vision blurs and a howling noise rings in his ears.

Steve Weller has watched this and says the sounds were added for dramatic effect: “Some people experience tinnitus from exposure events, but not like on the program.” Weller started suffering symptoms – heart palpitations and headaches – when he installed a wireless router in his home in 2001. The symptoms immediately dissipated once he turned the router off. He went on to spend more than NZ$22,000 on shielding his house, which didn’t stop the pain and discomfort coming on when he was outdoors.

In 2013, he finally left Melbourne to escape the compulsory statewide rollout of smart meters to measure electricity use, commonly blamed by Victorian EHS sufferers as provoking symptoms.

The notion of EHS would once have been “rubbish” to Weller. “I was addicted to my smartphone and playing computer games,” he says. Wireless technology gives us so much freedom that people don’t want to accept that it may come with a cost, he adds.

Bruce Evans is gloomily contemplating an NBN tower about to go live at Moyhu, near his favourite burger joint. The north-eastern Victorian town is just over the lip of the valley in which he lives.

Evans moved to a cottage adjoining his dad’s farm in 2012 after five years of deepening health problems in Melbourne. These began when he first used an iPhone. (“Bang! It was like someone had stuck an ice-pick in my head,” he says.) His symptoms intensified in line with the rollout of the 3G mobile network and smart meters.

During Evans’ last two years in Melbourne, he only left his room to buy food. His social life disintegrated and he couldn’t attend business meetings. Years earlier, he’d met a woman with a sensitivity to chemicals who refused to get in a car. “I was like, ‘Pffft, loony’ … I met a couple of other people in similar situations and I just wrote them off as nuts, bloody sensitive little namby-pambies. Then it started happening to me.”

Evans drives up a mountain to show me the valley in which he dreams that dozens of White Zones homes could be built. He stops to read his meter. It’s hundreds of times his safe limit. “Oh f…,” he says, reversing the van, away from the danger zone. Five minutes later, he touches his top of his head. “I’ve got pressure here.”

Evans posted his idea for a community on the web. One line read: “I want this area declared a sanctuary where telcos cannot infringe.”

The post went viral and emails poured in from around Australia and abroad. Theo R, 60, contacted him from a caravan on the Gwydir River, in NSW’s Northern Tablelands, where he was living with his partner, Irma, 55. The couple had moved to the tablelands in 2014, their only guests the occasional fisherman and flocks of native birds. Irma’s EHS is so severe, Theo had to construct an EMF-blocking Faraday cage – pasting heat-reflective foil over their entire mobile home.

Clinical studies have shown that sufferers frequently can’t tell when an EMF source is present; they only have symptoms when they believe one exists. Other studies indicate that the effects of EMF on laboratory animals, plants and human cells are real. These conflicting results are cited by EHS sufferers and sceptics as proof that each side is right.

Professor Rodney Croft, of the Australian Centre for Electromagnetic Bioeffects Research at the University of Wollongong, is keeping an open mind on whether EHS exists, despite his own research casting doubt on the claims of some sufferers, which he is now re-conducting. “My feeling is [their condition] won’t end up being due to radio frequencies, but there is a large number of people with quite serious problems,” he notes. “It’s very real.”

One way to prove EHS is real is with “provocation tests” – introducing and removing frequencies and asking sufferers to match their presence to their symptoms. According to Steve Weller, these tests can’t reliably distinguish genuine EHS victims from those suffering a possible “nocebo” effect (generating adverse symptoms themselves). Weller says that biological tests are a better way of testing for the condition.

Former Sydney University physics lecturer Jim McCaughan agrees. Provocation tests, he argues, “assume the brain is acting as a meter”. He believes that damage from EMF is cumulative.

McCaughan was forced to retire from academia after a sudden EHS onset in 2013, when he felt his brain “rippling” under his skull. “That was scary,” he says. When we meet in a Sydney cafe, he’s wearing a smart cream hat; underneath it are seven skullcaps made of shielding fabric which he says reduces his EMF exposure by 99 per cent. McCaughan speaks with a veteran lecturer’s rational tone. If he wears the shielding, he can function normally – if he doesn’t, he could pay for it later. That’s enough to prove a link, he insists.

The most high-profile official recognition of EHS in Australia occurred in 2013, when the Administrative Appeals Tribunal (AAT) awarded compensation to former CSIRO senior research scientist David McDonald. When he was hired in 1994, he told CSIRO he had EHS and was granted an assistant to help with computer work.

That help was withdrawn in 2006, and he was required to trial electronic equipment. Each time, he suffered nausea, headaches and migraines. Government insurer Comcare argued EHS is not an “ailment” as it has no diagnostic criteria, but the AAT dismissed this and ruled that CSIRO had worsened his EHS symptoms.

By 2009, as his condition worsened, McDonald, now 61, had to move with wife Lynne, 54, from their inner-city Melbourne house to a 40-hectare farm north of the city. They use a low-voltage electricity system, which runs the tiny TV on which he watches his footy team, Hawthorn, play. Going to a game is out of the question and his career is finished. “I’m not whinging about it,” he says. “I’ve just had to restrict my activities a great deal. Not working has been a huge restriction for me.”

His GP Russell Cooper’s diagnosis of EHS in 1992 formed part of the evidence at McDonald’s tribunal. While not commenting on McDonald’s case, Cooper says he sees sufferers react to WiFi in his Tasmanian practice if it is turned on. And he believes he’s identified a way to test for EHS – the first – which is being developed in a Greek laboratory, based on variations in “heat shock protein” genes that help protect people from radiation exposure. “It’s early days yet,” he says.

In the meantime, a grassroots movement is growing across Australia against new mobile or NBN towers. The community-based OREAD Project in Kyogle, NSW, adopted a biological approach to testing EMF effects ahead of a proposed NBN tower in the area. Twelve residents had their blood analysed, and the results were sent to NBN Co., Visionstream and Ericsson by Nimbin solicitor David Spain. If the tower is erected and subsequent blood tests show their health has been compromised, Spain says there could be grounds for an injunction or as a precedent in future planning cases.

If EHS is real, then the implications of more and more WiFi are scary. Lynne McDonald believes her husband could be one of the “coal-mine canaries” for EMF effects.

Bruce Evans enters a two-storey building on his dad’s farm where dormitory accommodation might be sited. The ground floor is a jumble of machinery, creating an obstacle course to the ladder leading upstairs. On the upper level, there are bird droppings on the floor and ripped cladding hanging from the ceiling. Seasonal hops pickers used to bunk here, but not recently.

His dad, John, 76, is outside. He resembles an older version of Bruce and also suffers from EHS. “I gave him an iPhone once and he was a write-off for two days,” says Bruce. “Yeah,” replies his father. What does dad think of having people with EHS here? “We’ve got all these old buildings here not being used for anything. We could have a set-up where people could come.”

The summit of a nearby hill is speckled with blackberry bushes, splats of dung and a few rabbits darting out of sight. Huts could be built here and on the facing slope. John is an irrigation engineer, so they can pump water up the hill. A dam in an adjoining hollow could be a recreation area for fishing. Evans works in the cottage at a kidney-shaped desk, with filters over the computer screens. He’s built a website called Radiation Refuge to match EHS sufferers with suitable accommodation, which had 14 listings in August.

You sense Evans thought his White Zone would be a simple undertaking: declare it open and they will come. But Diane Schou, who lives with about 50 other sufferers at the White Zone of Green Bank, West Virginia, warns there’s a lot to consider. “We are all different,” she says. “Certain frequencies seriously harm some of us, but do not harm others.”

Evans has learned that lesson the hard way, with several sufferers finding it difficult to stay there, and a recent one having problems as soon as she entered the valley. His first visitor, Kaytie Wood, felt the cottage was “not a safe place”. Wood, a 58-year-old energy healer, had an immediate headache as soon as she arrived. Evans turned off various items, including a smart meter housed 70 metres away in a shed. That helped, but over the next day she became steadily worse: her headache grew, she became nauseous and could barely move. “It was like having an all-over-the-body migraine and the power was off there,” says Wood. “It must have been something else.”

Evans convinced his sister – who runs a goat farm over the road – to turn off her electric fences, which helped. Wood camped outdoors the second night. “I think there was a lot of learning for Bruce,” she says. “He discovered we’re sensitive to different things.”

The NBN tower at Moyhu was recently turned on. Evans can’t measure any difference with his meters, but now feels like he has “termites in his head” when he goes for a run up the road.

In July, he discovered a mobile phone tower will be erected – he’s not sure when – on a hill he can see from his office window. His dream of a White Zone seems over. He doesn’t know how he will cope. He’ll have to take to the road and is hoping someone will donate a caravan for him to live in.

Theo R and Irma might have a solution. They moved in May to NSW’s Central West, to an abandoned five-room homestead on 160 hectares, owned by a friend, by the Warrumbungle National Park. Theo repaired the doors and windows and dug a new dunny pit. Irma has regained her energy and is thinking of starting a business. They’re inviting people with EHS to camp there.

“The scenery is second-to-none,” Theo says. “It’s a little miracle.”

Articolo originale al seguente link:

http://www.stuff.co.nz/life-style/well-good/teach-me/71753199/brain-on-fire-living-with-electromagnetic-hypersensitivity

Marine Richard : «Il faut créer des zones blanches» [Marine Richard : «Dobbiamo creare delle zone bianche»]

27 agosto 2015 – “La Depeche”, a cura di Paul Arnaud

[Articolo in Francese]

“La Santé près de chez vous – Électrosensibilité”

AAA
“Marine Richard a vu son hypersensibilité aux ondes électromagnétiques reconnue comme handicap par la justice. Elle en appelle à la création de zones blanches pour les électrosensibles.

Elle fait la Une de tous les médias de France mais refuse les photos et tient à rester discrète et tranquille, à l’abri des ondes, dans sa maison de pierres des Pyrénées ariégeoises. Elle ? Marine Richard qui se définit comme «une réfugiée environnementale», est devenue en quelques heures le porte-voix des électrosensibles après la décision du tribunal du contentieux de l’incapacité de Toulouse qui a reconnu comme handicap son syndrome d’hypersensibilité aux ondes électromagnétiques «dont la description des signes cliniques est irréfutable» (lire notre édition du 26 août). Un syndrome dont Marine Richard, ancienne journaliste et auteur dramatique, souffre de puis 2010. Elle milite dans de nombreuses associations engagées contre les ondes électromagnétiques.

Comment êtes-vous arrivée en Ariège ?

Je me considère comme une réfugiée environnementale. J’ai cherché pendant 1 an et demi, avant d’arriver en Ariège en 2012, un endroit protégé des ondes, où je puisse survivre sans souffrir physiquement.

Vous parlez de survie…

Le mot n’est pas trop fort étant donné les troubles physiques dont j’ai été affectée.

Comment cela se traduit-il ?

Il y a plusieurs types de symptômes. Les premiers sont des douleurs intracrâniennes extrêmement violentes qui peuvent aller de la sensation d’avoir une perceuse qui vous transperce le cerveau ou une sensation d’étau qui vous écrase la tête. Ce sont des douleurs insoutenables qui descendent aussi le long de la colonne vertébrale. Vous avez l’impression que votre tête va exploser. Viennent d’autres problèmes, cardiaques et neurologiques, qui affectent la concentration.

Ces symptômes peuvent-ils disparaître ?

Ces symptômes régressent quand on se trouve à l’abri des ondes. Des études scientifiques montrent que lorsqu’une personne sensible est exposée à des ondes, elle peut avoir une oxygénation cérébrale qui est à 30 % de la normale. Quand elle est à l’abri des ondes, son cerceau fonctionne normalement. ça rend la vie impossible. Le mot survie n’est pas trop fort.

Ce syndrome se soigne ?

La seule thérapie efficace est de se protéger des champs magnétiques. Il y a aussi des palliatifs qui permettent de supporter. Cela fait régresser les symptômes mais ne soigne pas la maladie qui est environnementale.

Votre victoire devant le tribunal va-t-elle faire jurisprudence ?

Il n’y a aucune raison que cela ne le fasse pas. Au-delà de mon cas personnel, il y a des milliers de personnes qui sont dans un état de souffrance intolérable. Cette première victoire va servir d’autres contentieux en cours contre des maisons du handicap ailleurs en France.

Peut-elle faire évoluer la réglementation ?

C’est compliqué de répondre. Le problème aujourd’hui est que les instances décisionnaires sont conseillées par les lobbys. À termes, il est inéluctable que l’état créé des zones protégées pour que certaines personnes atteintes de pathologies comme l’électrosensibilité puissent survivre. Je viens de recevoir le message d’un proche d’une personne qui s’est suicidée car elle ne tolérait plus sa souffrance physique et ne trouvait pas d’endroit où se réfugier.

Selon vous, il faut créer des «réserves» sans ondes ?

Malheureusement, oui. C’est intolérable de dire une chose pareille car on affirme qu’il faut exclure ces gens mais ils sont déjà exclus et ils souffrent physiquement. Il y a urgence à créer des zones blanches, protégées des champs électromagnétiques où des personnes trop affectées peuvent survivre en attendant que la société évolue et qu’on impose aux opérateurs d’abaisser les seuils de pollution. Et ça, c’est une volonté politique qui ne dépend pas de gens comme moi.

Marine Richard a écrit un livre présenté comme « un thriller rocambolesque. » « Sans mobile », Marine Richard, Le Square éditeur.

Elettrosmog, una sentenza sancisce l’invalidità civile

29 agosto 2015 – Il Fatto Quotidiano”, di Maurizio Martucci

telefonino_glucosio_nel_cervello_2228-1
“O perbacco: la notizia ha sconfinato le Alpi, approdando persino sul Tg1. E allora, apriti cielo, se ne sta parlando da alcuni giorni: il Tribunale di Tolosa ha sancito il riconoscimento di invalidità civile (più l’accompagnamento) ad una donna francese affetta da Elettrosensibilità, nuova malattia da società occidentale informatizzata (il lato oscuro del Digital divide e della Banda Ultra Larga! Una sorta di ‘allergia’ alle radiazioni da Wi-Fi, cellulari, Pc, ripetitori-antenne di telefonia mobile, che costringe a scappare, ritirandosi dalla società, per scongiurare violente e dolorose reazioni infiammatorie del corpo in rivolta) che l’establishment medico-scientifico-istituzionale fatica a riconoscere, nonostante l’evidenza di casi in esponenziale crescita e studi indipendenti come il lavoro della Commissione Internazionale per la Sicurezza dei Campi Elettromagnetici (ICEMS).

Ma l’ultimo verdetto è un dato di fatto col quale bisogna per forza misurarsi, e che fa il paio con la sentenza d’appello del Tribunale di Brescia, confermata in Cassazione, che in nome del popolo italiano nel 2012 ha decretato l’esistenza del nesso causale tra l’uso prolungato del telefonino e l’insorgenza di masse tumorali.

Imbarazza che, ancora una volta, il monito arrivi quindi dai togati e non dall’OMS, dallo IARC o da politiche governative di precauzione, vocati alla tutela della salute pubblica dall’indiscriminato utilizzo di apparecchiature a emissione di onde elettromagnetiche, in dote persino ai bambini come fossero giocattoli. Ma a dire il vero, la cosa non mi sorprende più di tanto se, al netto di astruse tesi complottistiche, penso ai continui richiami su trasparenza e assenza di conflitti di interesse degli operatori decisionali oppure al fatto che nelle casse dello Stato piovono proventi delle concessioni d’uso delle frequenze cedute ai gestori delle compagnie telefoniche. In ballo ci sono business vertiginosi, ma pure l’interesse del benessere della cittadinanza. Questo il punto: come coniugare progresso tecnologico con la prevenzioneverso nuove patologie altamente invalidanti.

Fin dove si continuerà ad avere la spregiudicata ostinazione di negare l’evidenza? Quando ci si deciderà a demarcare un punto di non ritorno (Renzi è pronto ad innalzare la soglia d’esposizione a 61 V/m?) visto che molteplici segnali cumulativi (Tolosa non è un indizio, ma un precedente!) ci dicono chiaramente che il filo s’è spezzato da tempo? E che non c’è poi tanto altro tempo da attendere? L’ubiquitaria e tutt’altro che precauzionale presenza di campi elettromagnetici artificiali e nocivi per l’umanità (e non solo!), rappresenta un grosso limite alla personale libertà di scelta sulla gestione della propria vita e della propria salute. Come la vicenda della giovane francese in fuga sulle montagne dei Pirenei ci insegna, anche in Italia c’è un mondo sommerso di elettrosensibili che tra l’indifferenza generale fugge dall’elettrosmog, attendendo il riconoscimento dei più elementari diritti del malato (per altro, disattesi proprio dagli stessi soggetti ‘inquinanti’). E’ ora di fare chiarezza, senza ambiguità: anche gli elettroscettici dovranno farsene una ragione, visto che in ballo c’è la salute di tutti (e non solo di quanti, ad oggi, sono già finiti dentro la ragnatela del male). Ma perché devono essere sempre i giudici a ricordarcelo?”

Articolo originale al seguente link:

http://www.ilfattoquotidiano.it/2015/08/29/elettrosmog-una-sentenza-sancisce-linvalidita-civile/1992608/

Erica Mallery-Blythe, MD at the Commonwealth Club of CA, June 22, 2015 (HD)

Erica Mallery-Blythe
Erica Mallery-Blythe, MD is Founder of Physicians’ Health Initiative for Radiation and Environment (PHIRE) in the U.K. where she is also Trustee of the Radiation Research Trust, Medical Advisor to Electrosensitivity UK and Member of the British Society of Ecological Medicine. She has worked in emergency medicine, led trauma teams and taught trauma medicine throughout the UK and abroad. She has a broad base of medical experience, including surgery, anesthesiology and intensive care (both neonatal and adult). For many years, Dr. Mallery-Blythe has worked intensively with adults and children suffering from the little-understood biological and health effects of wireless technologies, working closely with their doctors. She is author of a resource for parents, teachers, schools and policymakers called “Electromagnetic Health for Children”. Here, Dr. Mallery-Blythe presents on risks to children at a program organized by ElectromagneticHealth.org and Environmental Health Trust held at the Commonwealth Club on June 22, 2015.

Video al seguente link:
https://vimeo.com/131798243

Francia: indennizzo ad Elettrosensibile – Tg1 RAI ore 20:00 del 26 agosto 2015

La sentenza di un tribunale Francese di Tolosa costringe “La Maison Départementale des Personnes en Situation de Handicap (MDPSH)” a pagare un indennizzo ad una donna Elettrosensibile di 39 anni.
Le è stato riconosciuto un deficit funzionale dell’85% ed assegnato un trattamento previdenziale pari a 800 euro al mese per 3 anni, che potrà essere rinnovato.

La malattia viene definita “controversa” per la mancanza di prove scientifiche.
In realtà le prove scientifiche dei danni provocati dai CEM (campi elettromagnetici), soprattutto quelli in alta frequenza, sono numerose ed esistono da molti anni.  Infatti già nel lontano 1950, i  ricercatori russi che identificarono la cosiddetta “malattia da microonde”, descrissero danni in soldati e operai sottoposti ad una esposizione professionale giornaliera a radiofrequenze (RF) e apparecchiature a microonde.
Ciò che invece manca è una chiara conoscenza della patogenesi della malattia ed a questo proposito bisogna sottolineare che numerosissime sono le malattie la cui patogenesi non è certa (malattie autoimmuni, epilessia, ecc.) ma, nonostante ciò, vengono riconosciute come tali e trattate al meglio delle possibilità terapeutiche.

In seguito a questa importante sentenza, c’è da aspettarsi che il dibattito sul tema si farà più acceso.
Sarà interessante seguire l’evolversi degli eventi.

Al seguente link potete trovare come allegati le foto dei documenti relativi alla sentenza:
https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/electromagnetic_radiation_victims/ZXgdogoqvRg

Facciamo però notare che questo parrebbe non essere il primo caso in Francia, poiché, secondo quanto riporta il giornale “Le Figaro”, una sentenza simile è stata emessa nel 2014.

Al seguente link potete leggere l’articolo originale de “Le Figaro-Santé” datato 17 aprile 2014:
http://sante.lefigaro.fr/actualite/2014/04/17/22237-premiere-indemnisation-pour-electrosensibilite

Sanità: Francia, riconosciuta invalidità per ‘allergia’ a onde magnetiche

26 agosto 2015 – “Focus.it”

[Anche la testata Focus ha riportato la notizia dell’indennizzo riconosciuto alla malata di Elettrosensibilità francese]

Focus

“Un tribunale di Tolosa assegna pensione di invalidità per ipersensibilità elettromagnetica

Roma, 26 ago. (AdnKronos Salute) – L’allergia alle onde elettromagnetiche è un handicap. Almeno in Francia dove il tribunale per i contenziosi per invalidità ha riconosciuto il diritto alla pensione per una donna di 39 anni affetta da sindrome da ipersensibilità elettromagnetica, una patologia controversa su cui non ci sono prove scientifiche definitive, e che identifica come causa di una serie di sintomi le emissioni di antenne, cellulari, wi-fi.

Il tribunale, riferisce l’associazione (Robin des Toits, Robin dei tetti) che si batte da tempo per il riconoscimento della sindrome, ha dato ragione alla donna che aveva fatto ricorso contro il rifiuto della sua richiesta di pensione d’invalidità. Riconoscendo un deficit funzionale dell’85% alla donna, ex documentarista e drammaturga, che oggi vive isolata sulle montagne dei Pirenei, senza elettricità. La donna potrà contare su un contributo di 800 euro al mese per 3 anni, eventualmente rinnovabile.

La decisione del tribunale francese è stata accolta con entusiasmo dalle associazioni che chiedono attenzione ala patologia. Nel 2005 l’Organizzazione mondiale della sanità ha riconosciuto che l’elettosensibilità è caratterizzata da diversi sintomi non specifici, differenti da una persona all’altra, ma che non esistono basi scientifiche che permettono di legare i sintomi all’esposizione ai campi elettromagnetici.”

Articolo originale al seguente link:
http://www.focus.it/scienza/salute/sanita-francia-riconosciuta-invalidita-per-allergia-a-onde-magnetiche

FRANCIA – Sindrome da onde elettromagnetiche Pensione di invalidità a una donna

26 agosto 2015 – “Corriere della Sera”, Salute

[Anche una importante testata Italiana ha riportato la notizia dell’indennizzo riconosciuto ad una malata di Elettrosensibilità in Francia, chiaro segno del fatto che tutte le battaglie portate avanti da diversi esperti in materia di Elettrosmog ed Associazioni di malati stanno iniziando a dare i loro frutti.

Sono però d’obbligo alcune considerazioni nonchè una precisazione, che esponiamo a seguire.

La malattia viene definita “controversa” per la mancanza di prove scientifiche.
In realtà le prove scientifiche dei danni provocati dai CEM (campi elettromagnetici), soprattutto quelli in alta frequenza, sono numerose ed esistono da molti anni.  Infatti già nel lontano 1950, i  ricercatori russi che identificarono la cosiddetta “malattia da microonde”, descrissero danni in soldati e operai sottoposti ad una esposizione professionale giornaliera a radiofrequenze (RF) e apparecchiature a microonde.
Ciò che invece manca è una chiara conoscenza della patogenesi della malattia ed a questo proposito bisogna sottolineare che numerosissime
sono le malattie la cui patogenesi non è certa (malattie autoimmuni, epilessia, ecc.) ma, nonostante ciò, vengono riconosciute come tali e trattate al meglio delle possibilità terapeutiche.

Soprattutto a rischio sono i bambini, molto più suscettibili ai danni da CEM rispetto agli adulti.
E, seppur esistano in proposito chiare evidenze scientifiche provenienti da studi indipendenti (non quindi sovvenzionati dalle compagnie telefoniche) e rese note da tempo, nessuno si sta preoccupando di ridurre la esposizione dei bambini, che anzi stanno venendo incessantemente irradiati dalle microonde degli onnipresenti dispositivi Wireless, ora ampiamente utilizzati anche nelle scuole (nelle quali è obbligatoria l’installazione di reti Wi-Fi per la gestione delle attività).

Basandosi sulle attuali conoscenze, pare che la malattia abbia tra le cause principali una esposizione ai CEM ripetuta nel tempo anche a dosi non elevate, oltre alla esposizione acuta a dosi massicce.
Viene dunque da chiedersi quanti malati di Elettrosensibilità dobbiamo aspettarci in un futuro non troppo lontano, considerati l’abuso che si sta facendo della tecnologia wireless ed il numero sempre crescente di ripetitori della telefonia mobile che stanno venendo installati in prossimità delle abitazioni.

Ricollegandosi al discorso precedente, bisogna altresì chiedersi come lo Stato potrà gestire una simile emergenza sanitaria, considerato che tutti i soggetti colpiti saranno, oltreché dei malati molto sofferenti, anche degli inabili al lavoro bisognosi di una pensione di invalidità come la donna citata nell’articolo.

Infine vogliamo fare una precisazione. Questo parrebbe non essere il primo caso in Francia, poiché, secondo quanto riporta il giornale “Le Figaro”, una sentenza simile è stata emessa nel 2014, ed al seguente link potete trovare l’articolo originale de “Le Figaro-Santé” datato 17 aprile 2014:
http://sante.lefigaro.fr/actualite/2014/04/17/22237-premiere-indemnisation-pour-electrosensibilite]

Corriere

“Per la prima volta a Tolosa riconosciuto il danno per la controversa patologia per cui non ci sono prove scientifiche. Soddisfazione delle associazioni

Per la prima volta un tribunale ha riconosciuto come invalidante l’«allergia» alle onde elettromagnetiche. Lo ha deciso il tribunale di Tolosa che ha assegnato una pensione di invalidità per ipersensibilità relativa alle onde a una donna di 39 anni.

Una patologia controversa
La donna è afflitta da «ipersensibilità elettromagnetica», una patologia controversa su cui non ci sono prove scientifiche definitive, e che identifica come causa di una serie di sintomi le emissioni di antenne, cellulari, wi-fi. Nel 2005 l’Organizzazione mondiale della sanità ha riconosciuto che l’elettrosensibilità è caratterizzata da diversi sintomi non specifici, differenti da una persona all’altra, ma che non esistono basi scientifiche che permettono di legare i sintomi all’esposizione ai campi elettromagnetici.

Riconosciuto un deficit funzionale dell’85%
Il tribunale per i contenziosi per invalidità di Tolosa, riferisce l’associazione “Robin des Toits – Robin dei tetti”, che si batte da tempo per il riconoscimento della sindrome, ha dato ragione alla donna che aveva fatto ricorso contro il rifiuto della sua richiesta di pensione d’invalidità. Ha riconosciuto alla 39enne un deficit funzionale dell’85% e quindi un contributo di 800 euro al mese per 3 anni, eventualmente rinnovabile. Lei, ex documentarista e drammaturga, oggi vive isolata sulle montagne dei Pirenei, senza elettricità.
La decisione del tribunale francese è stata accolta con entusiasmo dalle associazioni che chiedono attenzione verso questa «patologia».”

Articolo originale al seguente link:
http://www.corriere.it/salute/neuroscienze/15_agosto_26/sindrome-onde-elettromagnetiche-pensione-invalidita-una-donna-c44fddb8-4be1-11e5-b0ec-4048f87abc66.shtml

Francia: indennizzo ad Elettrosensibile

21 agosto 2015

EHS

Una sentenza Francese costringe “La Maison Départementale des Personnes en Situation de Handicap (MDPSH)” a pagare un indennizzo ad una persona Elettrosensibile.
Al seguente link potete trovare come allegati le foto dei documenti relativi alla sentenza:
https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/electromagnetic_radiation_victims/ZXgdogoqvRg

Questo comunque non è il primo caso in Francia, poiché, secondo quanto riporta il giornale “Le Figaro”, una sentenza simile è stata emessa nel 2014.
Al seguente link potete leggere l’articolo originale de “Le Figaro-Santé” datato 17 aprile 2014:
http://sante.lefigaro.fr/actualite/2014/04/17/22237-premiere-indemnisation-pour-electrosensibilite

Wireless technology: Are we ignoring potential health risks?

2 settembre 2014 – “Astro Awani”

[Interessante articolo in Inglese proveniente dalla Malesia, il cui link potete trovare in fondo alla pagina.
E’ corredato di alcuni video che vale la pena vedere. ]

M-71405413784_freesize
“EVER wondered if radiation coming from wireless devices like mobile phones and telecommunication towers is really harmful to us?

A small group of Malaysians claim to have found evidence that overexposure to these devices, which all emit electromagnetic radiation (EMR) waves, could lead to various health problems.

For several years now, members of this group have been campaigning against telco towers being too near our neighbourhoods and schools, most notably the 1BestariNet project to provide internet for students in classes.

Astro AWANI spoke to experts from this group who have recently broken significant ground in their research into the subject. We also interviewed activists as well as those who claim to be able to immediately feel the effects of EMR waves. Lastly, we asked the government (Education Ministry) how it plans to tackle this issue.

What did the experts say?

Having personally seen several patients with some inexplicable symptoms, Dr Adlina Suleiman, an associate professor from MARA University of Technology (UiTM) and Dr Thor Teong Gee, a general practitioner, has been conducting several independent studies on the subject of EMR from telco towers.

So far, their latest findings seem quite scary: Those who have been living near to telco towers indicated a higher chance of getting headaches, giddiness, insomnia, loss of memory, diarrhea, mental slowness, reduced reaction time and mood swings.

They also found that more cases of cancer happens to those who live less than a few hundred metres away from these towers, concluding that one would have a higher risk of developing cancer after being exposed to EMR for years.

Dr Adlina, who noted the 2011 World Health Organization (WHO) report in which radiofrequency electromagnetic fields were classified as “possibly carcinogenic to humans”, said they are heading to Johor next to collect more data after conducting three studies – namely in Subang, Perak, and Penang.

“Blood samples we took (in Penang) found that there is a 1.1% increased risk of DNA damage those who live nearer to towers, compared to those not in high power density areas,” said Dr Adlina. (Watch video of interview with Dr Adlina)

While she admitted that the scientific community worldwide has not conclusively found causal relationship between EMR and illnesses, she argued that it took scientists some 40 years to find evidence that smoking tobacco can cause cancer.

“If you want to wait for clear evidence on the negative effects of EMR that only you are able prove that EMR will definitely cause something bad then we will do something about telco towers, then it may already be too late. Some people already have (health) problems,” said the doctor, adding that definitive prove can be obtained as soon as animal tests were done.

A victim’s cautionary tale

There were others who shared the fears of Dr Adlina and Dr Thor over EMR, and one of them had a first-person experience from its ‘harmful’ effects.

Lily Law claimed that she and her son, Elton, 9, were considered ‘hypersensitive’ to electronics and would “immediately” feel the effects of EMR waves almost as soon as they go near them, regardless of whether it comes from wireless internet devices or telco lines.

Law’s skin gets highly irritated, red, and itchy when she gets near wireless or telco devices, while her son would become more hyperactive and in more severe cases, complain of headaches.

“Actually, the doctor also doesn’t know why my skin is like this. It’s very itchy sometimes. Every day, I need to take medicine to control my skin problem.

“After I use cable (services) to connect my computer, now it’s not so bad,” she said, claiming that the effects can be felt within five minutes of being in a room with high levels of EMR.

While the conditions she and her son have are only shared by a few others she knew, Law noted that some researchers believe that by 2017, 50% of the population worldwide could be ‘hypersensitive’ like her.

The ‘anti radiation’ campaign

Also on a mission to reach out to more Malaysians and get the authorities to act on this controversial issue is the Penang EMF (Electromagnetic Fields) Protection Alliance. The group, part of the national level Anti EMF Radiation Alliance as well as the International EMF Alliance, has been voicing out on the dangers of telco towers since 2008.

“We are not at all saying we have to avoid all these communication technologies, but we have to consider the safety and health of our beloved families first,” its secretary, Ong Bee Lay, said.

Ong’s group has asked for the government, especially the Education Ministry, to take them more seriously: they want the authorities to change things at the policy stage so that guidelines on protecting people against dangers of radiation are more stringent.

Policy researcher Lim Jit Lee told Astro AWANI that other countries have laws that cover public health issues but Malaysia was lacking in this regard.

“We don’t want to argue whether it is safe or not. Because, if you want to say that studies are not strong enough to prove direct effect, the thing is, nobody can guarantee that it is safe for our children either at this moment,” Lee argued.

She said given the evidence shown by the local studies so far, the burden of proof that EMR technologies are safe should fall on providers and producers, not on the consumers.

Teacher activist Mohd Nor Izzat Mohd Johari of Suara Guru Masyarakat Malaysia (SGMM) has also asked the government to review the 1BestariNet project, especially in terms of complaints on speed issues.

Mohd Nor Izzat questioned if it was ethical for the towers, built by YTL Communications, to also be providing Wi-Fi services for residents outside of school compounds.

What is the government’s stance?

The government is aware that it has come under scrutiny, especially after announcing its plan in 2012 to install 10,000 telco towers in schools nationwide under the 1BestariNet project.

Touted to enable “every child the opportunity to access quality education at any time, from anywhere and according to his or her own pace”, the project is supposed to provide schools with broadband internet connectivity and Virtual Learning Environment.

Education Ministry’s Educational Technology Division director, Rosnani Mohamed Ali, said the various agencies are constantly monitoring 1BestariNet and its safety is at the forefront.

“From the studies we’ve done, we want to assure the teachers, students and parents that these towers are not dangerous to health… we follow all specifications.

“It is actually no more dangerous for a child to be in school with a 1BestariNet tower than to be in a school that has TV and radio coverage,” Rosnani told Astro AWANI, stressing that the 1BestariNet towers emit lower waves than other telco towers around Malaysia.

However, she assured that the ministry will take into account independent studies that are being done, and will review its performance periodically in all aspects.

What have the other agencies said so far?

A 1996 study by an ad-hoc committee consisting of government agencies such as the Health Ministry and several universities had concluded that there were no concrete proof to show that exposure to EMR would have any health effects or defects.

Malaysian Nuclear Agency radiation safety and health division manager, Dr Wan Saffiey Wan Abdullah was reported to have said there was no proof that emission from telco towers, which he said were lower than mobile phones, could cause illness to people nearby.

“We did not carry out studies on the effect of electromagnetic radiation on people but we adopted data used in the United States, Europe and China,” he had said during a dialogue with residents in Muar.

However, Dr Wan Saffiey admitted that there were people who were “electro-sensitive” to radiation from mobile phones, towers and Wi-Fi who could become ill. But the number was very small.

The Malaysian Communications and Multimedia Commission (MCMC) had also reportedly assured people that telco towers in Malaysia were well within international safety levels.

What’s next?

Although there has yet to be any conclusive, 100% proof linking EMR to health effects, the work from the Malaysian group who are using their own funds to study the subject seems to be getting somewhere.

Rightly, they should not be ignored.

The 1BestariNet project is of special concern as it involves the health of young, studying children, and the government is now expected to keep to its word that it would do further studies on its possible health risks.

But what if our worst fears were true, that it could really cause cancer?

There is nothing that the government, private entities and Malaysians would lose for finding out more through scientific studies. It would certainly only help us ensure that we could protect our next generation, one way or another.”

Link dell’articolo:

http://english.astroawani.com/malaysia-news/wireless-technology-are-we-ignoring-potential-health-risks-39806